Folktales - Princeton Public Schools

April 17, 2018 | Author: Anonymous | Category: N/A
Share Embed


Short Description

Download Folktales - Princeton Public Schools...

Description

Communication in a Cultural Context: Discover the Power of Folk Literature

This session shows how to use folktales as the focus of intrinsically motivating, language rich thematic units that teach and reinforce the curriculum’s linguistic and cultural concepts. Using Mexican and South American folktales, the presenter models units for novice level learners and offer resources for creating thematic units.

ACTFL 2011 Denver, Colorado Priscilla G. Russel 50 Springdale Rd Princeton, NJ 08540

Supervisor of World Languages Princeton Public Schools [email protected]

How to tell a story •Know the story, don’t memorize or read it – create a cheat sheet if necessary to help with the telling •Practice with props – it helps you to keep the story line •Dress the part •Insist on total focus from students – desks are cleared off, lights could be low •Set the scene – use a map or you board or a slide •Speak quietly to draw in your students – ask them if they are ready to listen to a story

Reading hints – when it’s time for students to read the folktale •Read the first time during class and in total silence without distraction – no questions, explain that students won’t understand everything and that they should keep going if they don’t understand somethin •Read each story several times – each time for a different purpose •Color code, e.g. for action and description in the past or all references to characters.

2

Checklist for choosing Authentic Literature Add up the checkmarks. If you receive 14 or more points and you like the story it may be appropriate

The story has…  Rhyme  Rhythm  Repetition

 Beginning, Middle, and End  Intrinsic Drama  Richness of the Target Culture  Targeted Language Functions  Connections to other disciplines

lends itself  Visuals to…  Props (Authentic a plus)  Acting it out  Storytelling  Signaling  TPR (The Asher version) is…  Interesting and Engaging  Meaningful to Students  Relevant to Curriculum Objectives  Age-appropriate  Linguistically appropriate (Krashen’s Input+1) 3

   

What Makes a Good Objective?

Directly tied to the standards Based on achieving a real-life performance Written in terms of Language Functions Realistic Performance Levels (See pages Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.)  Measurable and Demonstrable – avoid the verbs know, learn, understand

Sample Objectives  Identify description and actions in the past  Describe people and characters in the past  Narrate simple basic actions in the past  Describe fauna of Louisiana: habitat, food, color, special features  Name the flora of Louisana  Explain why the Creoles created Zydeco music.  Write your own story that takes place in Louisiana while avoiding all cultural anachronisms  Tell if you like certain Louisiana foods and describe the taste  Have an impromtu conversation that clearly takes place in Louisiana  Identify Beginning Middle and End of story  Narrate simple actions in the past  4

Write sentences that compare Louisiana

ACTFL National Standards (see p. Error! Bookmark not defined.)

and your state

5

Summary of Speaking Proficiency Guidelines Novice- Mid Novice-Mid speakers communicate minimally and with difficulty using a number of isolated words and memorized phrases limited by the particular context in which the language has been learned. When they respond to direct questions, they may utter only two or three words or an occasional stock (memorized/formulaic) answer. They are able to list. They pause frequently as they search for simple vocabulary or attempt to recycle their own and their speaking partner’s words. Because of hesitations, lack of vocabulary, inaccuracy, or failure to respond appropriately, Novice-Mid speakers will be understood with great difficulty even by sympathetic listeners accustomed to dealing with non-natives.

Novice-High Novice-High speakers are able to handle a variety of tasks pertaining to the Intermediate level but are unable to sustain performance at that level. Conversation is restricted to a few of the predictable topics necessary for survival in the target language culture.  respond to simple, direct questions or requests for information;  are able to ask a few formulaic questions when asked to do so;  express personal meaning by relying heavily on learned phrases or re-combinations of these;  provide short and sometimes incomplete sentences in the present tense and may be hesitant and inaccurate;  may appear to be surprisingly fluent and accurate when their utterances are stock phrases and mere expansions of learned material;  may experience strong first language influence in their pronunciation, as well as in their vocabulary and syntax when they attempt to personalize their utterances;  may be frequently misunderstood, but with repetition and rephrasing, they can be understood by sympathetic individuals used to non-natives;  when asked to handle simply a variety of topics or perform functions at the Intermediate level, can sometimes respond in intelligible sentences but cannot sustain this level of discourse.

Intermediate-Low Intermediate-Low speakers are able to handle successfully a limited number of uncomplicated communicative tasks by creating with the language in straightforward social situations. Conversation is restricted to concrete and predictable exchanges that would be necessary for survival in the target language country. Topics might include:  Information about self and family  Daily activities and personal preferences 6

 

Ordering food, seeking lodging, getting transportation, asking directions, making simple purchases

Speakers at this level are still primarily reactive to direct questions or requests for information, but they can ask a few appropriate questions. Intermediate-Low speakers express personal meaning by combining and recombining into short statements what they know and what they hear from their speaking partners. Their utterances are often filled with hesitancy and inaccuracies as they search for appropriate linguistic forms and vocabulary while attempting to communicate. Frequent pauses, ineffective reformulations and self-corrections typify their speech. While Intermediate-Low speakers can occasionally sprinkle in past and future time in their sentences, they primarily operate in the present tense to express their thoughts. Pronunciation, vocabulary and syntax are strongly influenced by first language, but with repetition and rephrasing, Intermediate-Low speakers can generally be understood by those who are accustomed to dealing with non-natives of the language. Adapted from the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines—Speaking Revised 1999

7

El sol y la luna Los mexicanos, cuando miran la luna ven la silueta de un conejo con sus orejas, cuerpo y rabo. Pero, ¿por qué hay un conejo en la luna y por qué brilla tanto el sol? Escucha atentamente esta historia de valor y autosacrificio para responder estas preguntas. Hace muchos años no había luz en el mundo. Los dioses de Teotihuacán se reunieron para decidir quiénes iban a dar luz al mundo. Todos los dioses estaban en un salón grande de uno de los muchos templos de Teotihuacán. Preguntaron: -¿Quiénes de nosotros van a dar luz al mundo? Todos sabían que dar luz al mundo no era una tarea fácil. Iba a costar la vida de los que decidieran hacerlo, pues tenían que saltar al centro de una gran hoguera. Nadie contestó al principio. Luego uno de los más jóvenes de los dioses, Tecuciztécatl, se levantó y dijo en voz alta: -Yo estoy dispuesto a dar mi vida por dar luz al mundo. Todos a una voz dijeron: -¡El dios Tecuciztécatl es un gran dios! Todos te felicitamos. Pero necesitaban a dos dioses y no había otro dios lo suficientemente valiente para acompañar a Tecuciztécatl. El se burló de todos diciendo: -¿Dónde hay un dios tan valiente como yo en toda la región? ¿Nadie se atreve a ofrecer su vida para dar luz al mundo? Nadie contestó. Todos guardaron silencio por unos minutos y luego comenzaron a discutir entre sí. Durante la discusión el ruido era tan grande y el movimiento tanto que no se dieron cuenta de que un dios viejito se levantó lentamente y se puso delante de todos ellos. El viejito era pobre y humilde. Su ropa no era elegante. Los otros quisieron saber por qué él se había levantado. -¿Qué quiere él? – dijeron algunos. -¿Quién cree él que es?- dijeron otros. -No tenemos tiempo para los viejitos ahora – dijeron los más jóvenes. - El no es lo suficientemente valiente – gritaron unos de los dioses. -¿Cómo puede querer un viejito dar su vida? – dijeron los principales de entre los dioses. Pero el viejito, levantó la mano, pidiendo silencio y dijo: -Yo soy Nanoatzín, viejo sí, pero dispuesto a dar mi vida también. El mundo necesita luz. Como no hay otros voluntarios, quiero ofrecer lo que queda de mi vida para dar luz al mundo. Después de un momento de silencio, - ¡Grande es Nanoatzín! – gritaron todos. Durante toda una semana nadie comió. Todos estaban en estado de meditación porque dar luz al mundo era muy importante. Cuando llegó el día, encendieron una gran hoguera en el centro del salón. La luz de la hoguera iluminó todo. Tecuciztécatl fue el primero que se acercó al fuego, pero el calor era tanto que él se asustó. Cuatro veces trató de entrar pero él no se atrevía. Tenía mucho miedo. Luego Nanoatzín, el viejito, se levantó lentamente y caminó hacia la hoguera. El entró en el fuego y se acostó tranquilamente. -¡Ay! – dijeron todos con mucha reverencia. Y en voz baja todos repitieron: - ¡Grande es Nanoatzín! Después le tocó a Tecuciztécatl. El tenía vergüenza. El viejito no tenía miedo y él sí. Así que él se echó al fuego también. 8

Todos los dioses esperaron y, cuando ya no había fuego, todos se levantaron y salieron del salón para esperar las luces. No sabían de dónde ni cómo iba a llegar la luz. De repente, un rayo de sol apareció en el este; luego, el sol entero. Después de un rato la otra luz apareció. Era la luna y era muy brillante como el sol. Uno de los dioses luego dijo: -No podemos tener dos luces iguales. Nanoatzín entró primero. El debe tener la luz más fuerte. Debemos oscurecer un poco la segunda luz. Y otro de los dioses agarró un conejo que estaba saltando por el campo y lo arrojó al cielo, pegándole a la luna para hacerla más oscura. Hasta el día de hoy, el sol es más brillante que la luna; y si uno se fija bien en la luna, puede ver las huellas del conejo. Y ahora sabes por qué el sol es más brillante que la luna y por qué los mexicanos, y ahora tú también, pueden ver un conejo cuando miran la luna.

9

¿Quién lo dijo? Une los personajes y los diálogos en oraciones completas. Ejemplo: ““¡Excelente! Popocatépetl, tú eres el nuevo jefe”, exclamó el emperador” Ó “El emperador exclamó,“¡Excelente Popocatépetl!, tú eres el nuevo jefe””.

1

2

3

“a mi regreso de la guerra tú y yo vamos a casarnos”

“yo fui el heroe de la Guerra y Popo está muerto”

Popo es el más valiente y también el más fuerte de todos nosotros

Usa estos verbos en tus oraciones

Dijo Preguntó Gritaron Prometió Exclamó Respondió

4

“¿Quién es el más valiente de todos los guerreros?”

5

“Sí, voy a esperarte porque te quiero mucho”

6

“¿Dónde hay un dios tan valiente como yo en toda la región?”

7

“No tenemos tiempo para los viejitos ahora”

10

El sol y la luna – escucha bien la leyenda y corrige los errores. (Levanta la mano cuando oyes un error or una tontería.) Hace muchos años no había luz en el mundo. Los dioses de Ecuador se reunieron para decidir quiénes iban a dar luz al mundo. Todos los dioses estaban en un salón grande de uno de los muchos templos de Teotihuacán. Preguntaron: -¿Quiénes de nosotros van a jugar al fútbol al mundo? Todos sabían que dar luz al mundo no era una tarea fácil. Iba a costar la vida de los que decidieran hacerlo, pues tenían que nadar al centro de una gran hoguera. Nadie contestó al principio. Luego uno de los más gordos de los dioses, Tlaloc, se levantó y dijo en voz alta: -Yo estoy dispuesto a dar mi vida por dar luz al mundo. Todos a una voz dijeron: -¡El dios Tecuciztécatl es un gran dios! Todos te felicitamos. Pero necesitaban a cuatro dioses y no había otro dios lo suficientemente valiente para acompañar a Tecuciztécatl. El se burló de todos diciendo: -¿Dónde hay un dios tan simpático como yo en toda la región? ¿Nadie se atreve a ofrecer su vida para dar luz al mundo? Nadie contestó. Todos guardaron silencio por unos minutos y luego comenzaron a discutir entre sí. Durante la discusión el ruido era tan grande y el movimiento tanto que no se dieron cuenta de que un dios muy alto y grande se levantó lentamente y se puso delante de todos ellos. El viejito era pobre y humilde. Su ropa no era elegante. Los otros quisieron saber por qué él se había levantado. -¿Qué quiere él? – dijeron algunos. -¿Quién cree él que es?- dijeron otros. -No tenemos tiempo para los conejitos ahora – dijeron los más jóvenes. - El no es lo suficientemente valiente – gritaron unos de los dioses. -¿Cómo puede querer un viejito dar su vida? – dijeron los principales de entre los dioses. Pero el viejito, levantó la mano, pidiendo silencio y dijo: -Yo soy Quetzalcoatl, viejo sí, pero dispuesto a dar mi vida también. El mundo necesita luz. Como no hay otros voluntarios, quiero ofrecer lo que queda de mi vida para dar luz al mundo. Después de un momento de silencio, - ¡Grande es Nanoatzín! – gritaron todos. Durante toda un año nadie comió. Todos estaban en estado de meditación porque dar luz al mundo era muy importante. Cuando llegó el día, encendieron una pequeña hoguera en el centro del salón. La luz de la hoguera iluminó todo. Tecuciztécatl fue el primero que se acercó al fuego, pero el calor era tanto que él se asustó. Veinte veces trató de entrar pero él no se atrevía. Tenía mucho frío. Luego Nanoatzín, el viejito, se levantó lentamente y caminó hacia la hoguera. El corrió en el fuego y se acostó tranquilamente. 11

-¡Ay! – dijeron todos con mucha reverencia. Y en voz baja todos repitieron: - ¡Grande es Tecuciztécatl! Después le tocó a Tecuciztécatl. El tenía vergüenza. El viejito no tenía hambre y él sí. Así que él se echó al fuego también. Todos los dioses esperaron y, cuando ya no había fuego, todos se levantaron y salieron del salón para esperar las luces. No sabían de dónde ni cómo iba a llegar la luz. De repente, un rayo –x apareció en el norte; luego, el sol entero. Después de un rato la otra luz apareció. Era una estrella y era muy brillante como el sol. Uno de los dioses luego dijo: -No podemos tener cuatro luces iguales. Nanoatzín entró primero. El debe tener la luz más fuerte. Debemos oscurecer un poco la segunda luz. Y otro de los dioses agarró una tortuga que estaba saltando por el campo y lo arrojó al cielo, pegándole a la luna para hacerla más brillante. Hasta el día de hoy, el sol es más brillante que la luna; y si uno se fija bien en la luna, puede ver las huellas de un dios. Y ahora sabes por qué el sol es más brillante que la luna y por qué los mexicanos, y ahora tú también, pueden ver un conejo cuando miran la luna.

12

13

14

A New Twist on Infogap Activities Why? This offers a way for students to gather information in the target language from a source other than the teacher. The speech bubbles provide language scaffolding for the students who would otherwise resort to English or create unintelligible questions. It also offers them multiple situations to practice saying the new words and focus on asking questions. It provides much more opportunity for the students to communicate in a highly structured format. This is a pure interpersonal task because it involves negotiation of meaning. How? Using the template the teacher fills in bits of information in category dispersed across the student forms. At the top the teacher fills in the speech bubbles to provide a model for the questions. Here are some suggestions to modify the task according to language level and class size. 

More information provided to students speeds up the activity



Less information provided means more opportunities to talk to different people



Alert the student to the color they are looking offers more structure

Implementation Teacher copies forms each on a different color paper, distributes one to each student and models the questions in the speech bubbles. She also reminds them how to react in the target language and alerts them to the signal to set down and be quiet. The teacher clearly states that the purpose of the activity is to speak the target language and gather information. Then the students get up walk around and collect information in the target language. Note: the teacher must invoke high stakes consequences for straying from the target language or simply copying and record and reward student participation. To download the template go to www.languageshaping.com

15

¿Dónde están las islas Galápagos? Instrucciones: Habla con tus compañeros para obtener la información que necesitas para completar tu gráfica. Cuando tienes toda la información necesitas usarla para completar tu mapa de las islas. (Cada color es una isla diferente.)

¿Cómo se llama tu isla?

Nombre de la isla en español Genovesa

(rosado) Española (amarillo)

Santa Cruz

(verde) Santiago

(Azul) Fernandina (violeta)

Floreana (blanco)

Isabela

(Anaranjado) 16

¿Qué es especial de tu isla?

¿Cómo se llama tu isla en inglés?

¿Cuál es una característica geográfica de tu isla?

¿Dónde está tu isla? ¿De qué tamaño es?

Fauna especial de la isla Sólo aquí se pueden ver los piqueros de patas rojas Sólo aquí se pueden observar albatros

Nombre en inglés de tu isla Tower

Características geográficas Una bahía es la caldera de un volcán antiguo

Ubicación y tamaño

Hood

Una playa blanca con arena muy fina

La isla más al sur y es pequeña

Hay personas y galápagos que viven aquí

Indefatigable

La arena es blanca y suave de coral pulverizado Tiene arena negra porque hay mucha lava

Al centro de las islas y es mediana

Hay muchos James animales marinos pero no hay personas

la más al norte de las islas

Al este de Isabela y al noroeste de Santa Cruz. Es bastante grande

Hay colonias grandes de iguanas marinas

Narborough

Un volcán muy activo, es la isla más joven

Está muy cerca de la costa oeste de Isabela

. A las tortugas marinas les encanta construir sus nidos.

Charles

Al sureste de Isabela y al sur de Santa Cruz, es más pequeña que Santa Cruz

Iguanas marinas y pingüinos

Albermarle

Playas con arena verde. Hay una laguna para flamencos muy rosados Tiene 5 volcanes activos

La isla más grande

¿Dónde están las islas Galápagos? (rosado) Instrucciones: Habla con tus compañeros para obtener la información que necesitas para completar tu gráfica. Cuando tienes toda la información necesitas usarla para completar tu mapa de las islas. (Cada color es una isla diferente.)

¿Cómo se llama tu isla?

Nombre de la isla en español Genovesa

(rosado) Española

¿Qué es especial de tu isla?

Fauna especial de la isla Sólo aquí se pueden ver los piqueros de patas rojas

¿Cómo se llama tu isla en inglés?

Nombre en inglés de tu isla Tower

¿Cuál es una característica geográfica de tu isla?

Características geográficas Una bahía es la caldera de un volcán antiguo

¿Dónde está tu isla? ¿De qué tamaño es?

Ubicación y tamaño la más al norte de las islas

(amarillo)

Santa Cruz

(verde) Santiago

(Azul) Fernandina (violeta)

Floreana (blanco)

Isabela

(Anaranjado) 17

Las islas encantadas ¿Quieren saber cómo se formaron las islas y por qué se llaman las islas encantadas? Pues, vamos todos a contar la leyenda que se llama . El mar estaba en silencio. No soplaba el viento y sus aguas movían perezosamente No se escuchaba ni el alegre chillido de los pájaros ni el chapotear de los peces. Una vez pasó por ahí una ballena y se quedó pasmada. Se dio cuenta de que en esa parte del mar no había nada. Trató de escuchar algún sonido pero no oyó nada y tampoco vio nada. La ballena tenía miedo y fue a avisar a sus compañeras. «Debemos salir de aquí porque más allá es el mar de nada.» dijo la ballena. Pues, el mar seguía dormido, indiferente a todo hasta que un día llegó a sus aguas una hermosa sirenita. Ella trató de escuchar algo pero no….. «Hay que hacer algo por este mar» exclamó la sirenita y se sumergió en busca de ayuda. Se encontró con el dios de los océanos y el dios le dijo tristemente, «Este pobre mar es tan perezoso» «Pero hay que hacer algo» exclamó la sirenita. Entonces el dios de los océanos respondió «¡Este mar va a recibir una gran sorpresa!» Horas más tarde, el mar hervía y saltaba. De sus aguas empezaron a emerger grandes volcanes humeantes. El mar se despertó asustado mientras la sirenita se reía. «Ya has dormido demasiado» dijo el dios de los océanos «y de ahora en adelante serás el más colorido y ruidoso de los mares.» Al instante empezaron a crecer inmensos cactos entre las rocas todavía calientes. Próximo formó dos corrientes de agua la una fría y la otra caliente. Por ellas empezaron a llegar a las islas miles de lobos marinos, rayas, tortugas gigantes e iguanas y sobre ellos, chillando de alegría, pelícanos, piqueros, fragatas, y albatros. La sirenita estaba feliz y el dios del océano orgulloso y el mar dormilón estaba sorprendido ante tanta vida ruidosa y alegre. Tiempo después, los incas recibieron noticias de unas islas maravillosas. Salieron de sus tierras para conocer estas islas y cuando llegaron a las islas no podían creer sus ojos. ¡Qué gran belleza! Los incas dieron gracias al dios por haberlos llevado a este paraíso. Pidieron al dios que protegiera las islas contra los hombres que querían destruirlas. El dios decidió rodear las islas con un manto de bruma para que los marineros no pudieran encontrarlas fácilmente. Por eso recibieron el nombre Las islas encantadas.

18

Las islas encantadas ¿Cuándo pasó?

¿Quiénes son los personajes? ¿Cómo eran y qué hicieron?

¿Dónde pasó?

Mi parte favorita

Palabras importantes

¿Qué pasó? ___________________________________

Resumen La situación: No había ___________________________________________________ Acción: ________________________________________________________________ Acción: ________________________________________________________________ Acción: ________________________________________________________________ La resolución: __________________________________________________

19

Sequencing Galapagos Story Hace muchos años, no había nada en el mar. La sirena llegó y quería ver mucha vida. La sirena habló con el dios del mar y él decidió hacer algo. Primero emergieron grandes volcanes. Próximo grandes cactos empezaron a crecer. El dios formó dos corrientes de agua. Llegaron muchos animales, y pájaros y peces. Los animales estaban muy alegres y ruidosos. Unos incas visitaron las islas y hablaron con el dios El dios formó un manto de bruma para proteger las islas encantadas.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

Sequencing Techniques Picture Sequencing: Students are shown between 3 and 8 pictures from the story. They are asked to put them in the right order. The pictures should be lettered (not numbered) to avoid confusion. The purpose of this activity is to reinforce or test comprehension of the story. It is appropriate for beginning language learning six years or older. Pre-sequencing: Students are asked guess at the sequence of pictures or sentence strips before reading or listening to the story. This helps them to predict the outcome. This is appropriate for all language learners eight years or older. Identify story elements: Students are asked to identify the major parts of the story. For younger students: beginning, middle, and end. For older students: the conflict and the dénouement. Sentence Sequencing: Students place between 3 and 8 sentence strips in chronological order of the story. The teacher or the class reads the story out loud. Students then practice reading the story in pairs. They then proceed to copy the story since copying is the first stage of writing. You can then ask them to illustrate the story. For older students ask them to move the setting from Africa to Japan, Europe, Tahiti, or America. More advanced students can be asked to re-write the story for the setting, i.e. changing the animals and the setting. Word Sequences: Students are given individual words. They are asked to come forward and form the correct sentence. If your language maintains a fixed word order, this can be a simple test of their readiness to write. If word order is unimportant in your language use this activity to reinforce the idea. It is easy to move students around using the second language to physically demonstrate the idea. Transition Words: To prepare students to write narrative and practice important transition words (First, then, next, later, finally). They are asked to place a transition word before each sequenced sentence or picture. Use pictures for beginning students and sentences for more advanced students.

Why do Sequencing?  Sequencing helps younger students develop higher order thinking skills  Sequencing helps older students apply successful reading strategies to the second language.  Helps students who are not naturally good readers to learn the habits of active reading. 20

Assessment Ladders Interpretive (from easiest to hardest)         

Identify statements as True or False. Draw scenes from story from written prompts. Find the illogical intruder from a list of words Match character to the description Order a series of statements to retell story Listen to one of the Characters tell about his plans, pencil them in on his calendar Complete Written Cloze activity Highlight all the descriptive words in the text. From a list of statements about the story, identify logical and illogical inferences and explain choice made

Interpersonal (from easiest to hardest)  Identify pictures of characters using single words  With a partner order a series of pictures to tell the story  Milling Activity: Students obtain information by interviewing other students with         

conversation prompters. Act out a scene involving conversation with a partner Have a conversation with another student in the role of the characters. Have a conversation with your partner to explain your opinion of the story Use an illustration – with a partner talk about what is occurring Use sentence strips to sequence the story with a partner Introduce a new character through an impromptu conversation. Complete story map with partner: Identify when, where, characters, problem, resolution Add another impromptu scene that involves conversation to the folktale Negotiate in the target language with group to decide the characters and plot points of a new story

Presentational (from easiest to hardest)  Sequence pictures to tell a story.  Create a poster in which you draw a scen from your favorite part of the story and write a summary sentence about it.

 Draw your favorite part of the folktale and state why it is your favorite  Communicate about the story using your graphic organizer – identifying setting    

characters, problem, and resolution. Label scenes from story using complete sentences Complete story map: Identify when, where, characters, problem, resolution Create a comic strip including dialogue to summarize the story Write complete sentences to identify characteristics and actions of the characters. 21

 Orally retell the story using picture or object cues.  Create a folktale using authentic animals and setting  Create a handcrafted book

Culture (from easiest to hardest)  Read a sentence on a culture topic and illustrate it. (Interpretive)  Read a paragraph on a culture topic and illustrate it. (Interpretive)  Label pictures showing cultural items. (Interpretive with word bank, Presentional without)

 Students read a story and identify the cultural anacryonisms. (Interpretive)  Draw a culturally authentic scene and describe what is happening in the scene     

22

(Presentational) Find the cultural intruder from a list of words and justify choice (Interpretive) Identify photos of people in traditional costumes and identify their culture. (Interpretive) Write a story using authentic setting, products and practices without creating cultural anacryonisms. (Presentational) Class interviews one student responds in character (Interpersonal) Continue a Conversation from the story (Interpersonal)

Making Literature Accessible to Novice Level Learners Traditional Approach to Reading

Making Literature Accessible

23

Making Literature Accessible to Novice Learners Pre-Reading Predicting Anticipation Guide Personal Questions Character Webs Language Functions TPR for vocabulary Infogap to acquire new information Phonics

Setting the Scene Accessing Prior Knowledge Storytelling Action Play Direct Instruction of Reading Strategies Strategies prominently posted in Classroom in target language

Reading Read independently in silent classroom Chunk the story out into digestible pieces Divide story to beginning, middle, end Change physical presentation of the story into booklet, serial, greeting card form

Identify Characters Highlight language functions  Color Code Emotions  Description in the Past  Narration in the Past  Sequencing words  Dialogue Highlight and web references

Post-reading Why Questions → Open-ended Questions Story Map Character Web Personal Reaction Comparison with other folktale

24

Sequencing Predicting how characters would react in a new situation Adding a new scene Illustrate a scene or the story Summarizing

Language Menu to Adjust Difficulty of Activities

Snacks (Easier)

Lunch

Hearty Meal (Harder)

 Cooperative Group

 Work in Partners

 Sequence Pictures

Independently  Sequence sentences  Summary Sequence

& Sentences  Read Aloud w/Class  True/False Questions  Draw Beginning Middle End  Identify important

characters and things

 Read Aloud

 Work

 Read Independently

w/Partners  Either/Or Questions  Open-ended Questions  Summarize  Summarize Beginning Middle End  Associate traits  Describe Characters w/Characters

*N.B. You can use different levels for the same activity in the same class to differentiate instruction.

25

Folktales: Weaving Language and Culture Together Reprinted from Learning Languages volume XI issue 2, the journal of NNELL by Priscilla Russel Picture the Senegalese griot seated on his stool under the generous shade of the baobab tree. Gathered on the ground around him are the village children engrossed in the folktale that he is passing on to the latest generation. Perhaps he is re-telling Le Prince et la souris blanche in which the tribal king sets various tasks for his three sons and a little mouse wins the day for the youngest. Or, the griot may chose to tell Le Secret de Lunelle about the friendless, young girl who wishes for a friend and one day receives a magic box containing a little playmate. In another part of the world a Japanese street vendor with hopes of later selling his sweets to his audience, uses a set of colorfully drawn and painted cards to narrate Momotaro, the Peach Boy to the children gathered round. He is performing Kamisibai. Each card in the series has a scene on the front and the storyline for the next card in the story is on the back. This way the teller can show the card to his audience while reading the story. Momotaro is perhaps the best known and best loved Japanese folktale. It is a wonderful story that tells of an old couple who found a big, delicious looking peach with a baby boy inside who quickly grew into a strong young man. Wearing a hachimaki (headband) to strengthen his spirit and carrying danko (traditional dumplings), he goes off to conquer the oni (ogres), and with the help of a monkey, a pheasant and a dog returns with riches for his parents. For centuries folktales have played a central role in passing on the traditional culture of societies. From places as disparate as Francophone Africa and the Andean highlands come folktales that offer insights into the practices and perspectives of their societies. Often this oral tradition explains something from nature or offers a caution. What child will forget about the fate of the little turtle in the Chinese folktale The Boastful Tortoise? When the tortoise became envious of the praise the egrets received who were carrying him to water and safety, he stopped holding on to the supporting stick and fell far and hard to the ground. As Abrahams (1983, p. xvi) writes, “storytelling is a fundamental way of codifying hard won truths and dramatizing the rationale behind traditions.” In our classrooms folktales can provide an introduction to authentic literature for even our youngest or newest language learners. The case for using folktales is strong. Although translated stories offer familiar plots and usually have accompanying colorful pictures, they lack the cultural foundations of authentic literature. Additionally, Sexton (1992, p. xxi) writes, “folklore offers a great deal of information about the environmental setting of a culture, particularly with respect to the plants, animals and material found in it.” For

26

instance, the Maya tale Las orejas del conejo from the subtropical forest of the Yucatan, features cenotes (sinkholes) and the animals of that region. The collision of European and American cultures appears in the Cajun version of Little Red Riding Hood. Petite Rouge takes place in the bayou with an alligator that ends up in the gumbo. A folktale can bring culture to a content-related thematic unit. For example, third graders in Princeton study the solar system both in their general classroom and in Spanish class. Originally, El sistema solar was a content and language rich unit devoid of culture; however, adding the Aztec creation myth El sol y la luna has now enriched the unit with cultural information. Incorporating creation myths from a target culture such as Le Soleil et la lune from Francophone Africa adds a new dimension to the study of the sun and the stars. Bookstores, libraries, museums and the Internet offer many folktales, fairy tales, legends, myths and fables. While it is quite easy to find folk literature from all cultures, selecting those appropriate for the classroom can be challenging. In reading or listening to each new tale, I mentally go through the checklist that I have developed with colleagues to evaluate the suitability of each tale: Can I “see” each part of the story? Being able to use pictures or objects to tell the story is important to making the story accessible to our young learners. Is it structured with an obvious beginning, middle and end? In other words, does it have a story format? Will my kids like this story? Does it have intrinsic drama that draws them in and keeps them engaged until the end? The gore in Le Loup Garou, a Québécois tale, appeals to middle school students as does romance under adversity in Turrialba, a Costa Rican legend. Animals are a favorite topic for elementary students and fables such as El león y el grillo, the Maya legend, and the Cajun tales with Bouki, offer lessons in using one’s wits to overcome adversity. How does this story connect to and enrich my existing curriculum or form the thematic center of a new thematic unit? The limited time we have with our students does not allow us the luxury of including anything that does not directly tie in with the unit objectives. Finally, will this tale be a powerful vehicle for the language I want my students to be able to use? Placing language in context makes the job easier for both the teacher and students. Folktales offer a rich cultural context for communication. Before telling the story or asking students to reading it, teachers must make the folktales accessible to their students by pre-teaching vocabulary and language functions, involving the students in predicting what may happen and perhaps describing the characters. And then, their students will be ready to enjoy learning a new folktale. ¡Colorín, colorado, este cuento se ha acabado!

References Abrahams, R. D. (Ed.). (1983). African folktales – Traditional stories of the black world. New York: Pantheon.

27

Resources Professional Thematic Units for Sale www.languageshaping.com  “Unos animalitos astutos” A thematic unit for intermediate Spanish centered on authentic Maya and Aztec folktales. Includes complete lesson plans, color flash cards, transparencies, CD-Rom with animated stories and an Audio CD. ISBN: 0-9718678-8-7  “Mitos del mundo azteca” – a thematic unit for novice and intermediate Spanish centered on authentic Aztec folktales. Includes complete lesson plans, color flash cards, transparencies, CD-Rom with animated stories and an Audio CD.

Folktales  Sosnowski Language Resources, 58 Sears Rd Wayland, MA 01778. Tel: 508-358-7891, Fax:          

508-358-6687. E-mail: [email protected] World of Reading, Ltd., P.O. Box 13092, Atlanta, Georgia 30324-0092, Voice: (404) 2334042, Toll Free: (800) 729-3703, Fax: (404) 237-5511, E-mail: [email protected], www.wor.com Ayala, R.R., Mitos y Leyendas de los Incas, Edicomunicación, 1999. ISBN 84-7672-895-6 Barlow, Genevieve, Leyendas latinoamericanas, National Textbook Company, Barlow, Genevieve and William Stivers, Leyendas mexicanas, NTC El conejo y el mapurite – cuento venezolano, Ediciones Ekaré ISBN 980-257-006-0. This press is a good source Galván, Nelda, Cuentos de la tradición mexicana, Selector actualidad editorial, 1999, ISBN 970-643-187-x González, Olympia, Leyendas cubanas, NTC Kennedy, James, Relatos latinoamericanos: la herencia africana, NTC Legends of Mexico, National Endowment for the Humanities and University of Cincinnati, 1996 Muckley, Robert and Adela Martínez-Santiago, Leyendas de Puerto Rico, NTC

Pedagogy  Languages and Children--Making the Match: New Languages for Young Learners, Grades       28

K-8, Fourth Edition by Helena Curtain, Carol Ann Dahlberg Egan, Kieran” The Underused Power of the Story Form in Teaching”, Westminister Studies in Education, vol 10, 1987. Guntermann, Gail, ed., Teaching Spanish with the Five C’s, Vol 2 , AATSP, Harcourt Publishers,2000. Hadley, Alice Omaggio, Teaching Language in Context, Heinle and Heinle, 2001 Horning, Kathleen, From Cover to Cover, Evaluating and Reviewing Children’s Books, harper Collins, 1997. Krashen, Stephen, The Power of Reading, Libraries Unlimited, 1993. Lee, James F. and Bill Vanpatten, “Grammar in communicative Language Teaching”, Making Communicative Language Teaching Happen, McGraw-Hill, 1995

 Met, Myriam, editor, Critical Issues in Early Second Language Learning, Addison-Wesley, 1998  McTighe, James and Grant Wiggins, Understanding by Design, ASCD, 1999.  Schofer, Peter, Text as Culture: Teaching through Literature and Language, Harcourt college Publishers, 2002.  Swender, Elvirra and Greg Duncan,”ACTFL Performance Guidelines for K – 12 Learners”, Foreign Language Annals, 31, No. 4, 1998

29

View more...

Comments

Copyright © 2017 ECITYDOC Inc.