Raising and Releasing Trout

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Raising and Releasing Trout

Sierra Watershed Education Partnerships, CA Teacher Guide

Lesson Plan ............................................................................................................................................. 1 Resources ................................................................................................................................................ 4 Links....................................................................................................................................................... 4 Chiller Options........................................................................................................................................ 5 News & Press.......................................................................................................................................... 6



Final Report...................................................................................................................................... 7-12 Next Generation Science Standards................................................................................................ 13-14

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Raising and Releasing Trout

Sierra Watershed Education Partnerships, CA Project Synopsis Students in fourteen elementary, middle school and high school classes in the Tahoe - Truckee area of California raised endangered Lahontan cutthroat trout from eggs to fry. In the process, they observed the trout life cycle and researched the value of this native species in the local ecosystem. The participating classes traveled to cold-water trout streams and released their fry in the spring. Students learned about suitable conditions for trout habitat and monitored the streams into which the fry were released, testing for water quality and temperature. Adapting the Project for Replication Trout Unlimited has developed a project model called “Trout in the Classroom” which can be instrumental in setting up a program. See the Resources section for links to information and technical assistance. The Trout Unlimited web site also provides a “crowd-sourced” selection of science and interdisciplinary lessons related to raising trout, reproduced at the end of this lesson plan, with permission. It is important to establish a relationship with a state fish hatchery that can provide fish eggs. The featured project benefitted greatly from the efforts of a non-profit organization: Sierra Watershed Education Project, that obtained permits for raising endangered species (not always an option in other parts of the country), trained teachers, established protocols, provided equipment to schools, delivered eggs, set up a blog, provided technical assistance, and facilitated field trips for release of fry. For tips on developing a program that is effective and sustainable, please see SWEP’s final project grant report, included in the Resources section. In some parts of the country, “Salmon in the Classroom” programs are sponsored by state Fish and Game or Natural Resources Departments. Sturgeon and bass raising programs are also available in a few warmer states. Conduct an internet search to see if such a program exists in your area.

Correlation to NGSS 3-LS1-1 Growth and Development MS-LS2-A Interdependent Relationships MS-LS2-C Ecosystem Dynamics MS-LS4-C Biodiversity Supplies and Equipment Basic Materials • Chiller • tank (30-55 gallons) • table, counter, or stand for the tank • shade for the eggs • Fluval 405 canister or Hagen AquaClear filter • Filter media • Pea-size Gravel • Whisper 20 Air Pump • Sandstone 12” Airstone • 8’ Flexible Airline Tubing • Check Valve - 1 pk • Net Breeder -- or homemade basket • Battery Operated Digital Thermometer • Floating Thermometer • 4” Net • Microbe Lift or other bacteria boost • Siphon Gravel Cleaner • 10’-15’ Flexible Tubing 5/8”** • Zinc Plated Clip 1/2” 2 pk** • Freshwater Master Test Kit Other Equipment (as needed) • Turkey baster • Buckets (2 or more) • Battery-operated aerator • Long-handled scrub brush • Ammonia removal compound • Tap-water-safe compound • Clean ice packs, for use in transportation and/or chiller emergencies Equipment Replaced Yearly • Filter pads or cartridges • Airstone and check valve • Water Quality Test Kit

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Procedures Project Planning 1. Review technical information about the program and determine feasibility 2. Raise funds and establish partnerships, as necessary 3. Obtain supplies and equipment listed 4. Identify a source of fish eggs (state hatchery) 5. Establish timeline for obtaining eggs and releasing fry 6. Select grade-appropriate lessons in science or other subjects, from attached list 7. Set up aquarium and chiller per the directions in the Resources section 8. Arrange for egg delivery Project Preparation for Students 1. Research fish species being raised and 2. Research habitat necessary for survival Conducting the Project 3. Feed and care for fish eggs and fry 4. Observe and monitor fry (anatomy, life cycle, behavior, growth, habitat, interrelationships, etc) 5. Design and carry out investigations with fry 6. Test water quality of tank and determine if it meets requirements for trout survival 7. Collect fry survival and growth data to record, analyze and graph 8. Test water quality at proposed release location and deter mine if it meets requirements for trout survival 9. Release fry at a stream that provides suitable habitat in that location and downstream 10. Mark trout stream with artwork or signage, to educate others about importance of keeping water clean

Project Partners Captain Planet Foundation Sierra Watershed Education Partnerships (SWEP) California Trout Trout Unlimited’s Trout in the Classroom Tahoe Environmental Research Center Lahonton National Fish Hatchery California Department of Fish and Wildlife Tahoe Resource Conservation District Rotary Clubs Truckee U C Davis /Tahoe Environmental Research Center Pet Station Placer County Fish and Game Commission US Fish and Wildlife Service This American Land Greenhouse or indoor location for starting This American Land is an original conservation newsmagazine series on public television stations nationwide. Opening windows to our country’s amazing natural heritage, the show reports engaging stories on America’s landscapes, water, and wildlife, taking viewers to the front line of conservation, science and outdoor adventure with stories that inform and entertain. This American Land is produced by Environmental New Trust (ENT), a non-profit news venture which has produced and distributed hundreds of environmental news stories for an international broadcast and Internet audience since 2004, ENT was founded by award winning television correspondent Gary Strieker, who reported for 20 years with CNN as a bureau chief and international environment correspondent. Gary is the executive producer of This American Land.

Technology Integration Technology incorporated in this project includes aquarium chillers and (optional) probes for testing water quality parameters in the classroom aquarium and the stream where fry will be released.

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Native Trout Plant Restoration LITE The two most expensive elements of a trout raising project are the cost of an aquarium chiller (approximately $650) to keep the fry at temperatures needed for survival, and the cost of transporting of students to a cold-water trout stream for release of the fry. A less expensive, smaller scale option is to adapt a thermoelectric cooler or wine chiller (approx. $150) by removing the shelves and inserting a three gallon aquarium with a light, per these instructions. Alternatively, classes that adopt warm water species, such as bass, can raise eggs and fry in a regular aquarium and release in an appropriate body of water that may be closer to the school. Check with your state Fish and Wildlife or Game and Fish department to see what species of eggs are raised in state hatcheries and may be available for classroom projects. Debriefing At the end of this project, students will understand that fish are not randomly distributed around the earth but have adapted over generations, in conjunction with other plants and animals, to be suited to a particular place and its water temperature, nutrients, climate, soils, etc. Human impacts including over-fishing, clearing and development of land, building roads that fragment habitats, removing or introducing species of plants or animals, degrading water quality by disposing of trash or contaminants anywhere in the watershed, warming water, etc., will change the potential of the land to support native plants and animals. Non-native plants and animals may be present in an ecosystem because they have been introduced by humans, or because abiotic elements have been altered by humans. Non-native species may out-compete native species for limited resources (space, water, food, sunlight) due to lack of predators or other limiting factors they would typically face in their native environment. Environmental Stewardship and Citizen Science Environmental stewardship projects, such as native fish restoration, are empowering because they offer students a chance to make a difference by solving real-world problems. This is especially important because research has shown that learning about environmental science in the absence of such opportunities to act, can be overwhelming and affect adult attitudes and behaviors. Stewardship projects also cultivate collaboration, communication and other skills that contribute to employability in STEM fields. Extensions Environmental stewardship projects, such as native fish restoration, are empowering because they offer students a chance to make a difference by solving real-world problems. This is especially important because research has shown that learning about environmental science in the absence of such opportunities to act, can be overwhelming and affect adult attitudes and behaviors. Stewardship projects also cultivate collaboration, communication and other skills that contribute to employability in STEM fields.

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Links SWEP Trout in the Classroom Blog for this project: http://troutintheclassroom.wordpress.com/

SWEP video of egg delivery day for this project http://www.youtube.com/watch?y=jUQU0ZRENOw

Technical Information, including equipment details, set-up, timeline, trout care, trout feeding, transportation, and year-end http://www.troutintheclassroom.org/teachers/technical-information

State-Specific Resources for Trout in the Classroom

http://www.troutintheclassroom.org/teachers/state-specific-resources

Trout in the Classroom web site http://www.troutintheclassroom.org/

Trout in the Classroom Lessons and Science Activities

http://www.troutintheclassroom.org/teachers/lesson-plans/science

Field Guide to Trout and Salmon

http://www.streamexplorers.org/fish-facts/trout-and-salmon-species/brook-trout

The Way of a Trout movie

http://www.lrctu.org/movies/TheWayofaTrout/

Characteristics of a healthy trout stream

http://www.troutintheclassroom.org/teachers/library/dream-stream

Salmon Running the Gauntlet http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/episodes/salmon-running-the-gauntlet/video-full-episode/6620/

Salmon life cycle http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/episodes/salmon-running-the-gauntlet/salmon-lifecycle/6559/

Raising Bass

http://www.bassresource.com/fish_biology/smallmouth-fry.htm

Small Fry to Go Program

http://www.smallfrytogo.net/

Source of Fish Posters

http://www.nature-discovery.com/page_1_34/trout-salmon-char-of-north-america-i-fish-poster

Free Fish Identification and Record Weight Poster

http://www.anglingtrust.net/news.asp?section=29&from=2012/01/01&to=2013/01/01&itemid=1446

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Chiller Options from Trout Unlimited You will need a chiller to keep the tank’s water temperature at about 50° Fahrenheit. Most chillers are only designed to chill aquarium water to around 60°-70° Fahrenheit. Therefore, for our program, we must purchase chillers that are rated for a larger size tank--for example, for a 55-gallon TIC tank, we purchase at least 1/4 horsepower chillers which are technically designed for 100-125 gallon tanks. Some classes prefer to purchase 1/3 horsepower chillers, just to increase longevity by decreasing wear. By using a more powerful chiller, we decrease our chances of burning our chiller out after only a year or two. Here are the most popular chiller options:

1. AquaEuro 2. Glacier —the original TIC chiller, a drop-in.

Glacier Corporation Chiller - Ph# (714) 557-2826 1/6 Horsepower -1 year warranty – Immersed Coil Type (Cooling coil is placed in water)– While this unit is very durable and has been the standard in the past, the chillers below are now generally preferred. No tubing or pump needed for the chiller. A pump will be needed for the UV sterilizer—use what is recommended for the UV flow rate.

3. TradeWind --a reliable, well-priced alternative

Many TIC programs have been having great luck with chillers (a variety of styles and sizes) from TradeWind Chillers. Notes about the pump: Once you have selected a chiller, that will determine which size pump you use. Each flow-through chiller requires a certain range of gallons or water per hour. Please ask your chiller source the recommended pump capacity and power for the chiller you chose.

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dnesday, June 26, 2013

Sierra Sun 06/26/2013 | Sierra Sun

MMUNITY BRIEFS

nt for briefs is selected from e-mail ions to Community Editor Amy t [email protected] E-mail for bmissions may be 150 words. Items ed in the print edition news space ng.

gsholm: Conversation History, June 26 memorable evening at Emerald e Park and the incomparable holm Mansion. Leaving from DL Bliss rk, you will be able to drive your hicle into Emerald Bay. Following a behind-the-scenes” tour, guests t in the courtyard where wine and euvres will be served. Dr. Helen ill host an informal conversaut her experiences spending 14 s at Vikingsholm as the guest of night, the owner and visionary Vikingsholm. Smith will present a opy of her book “Vikingsholm,” a he authored, to every guest. The kingsholm” will be available for kets are $50 per person and space d. Call 530-583-9911 to reserve a purchase tickets online at www. ateParks.org.

Out & Play at s Playground uckee Tahoe Airport District Board ors and staff invite you to join a on and Ribbon Cutting for Katie’s und, commemorating the memory Hannah and Wyatt Morrison. Morrison served as an Airport District ember and Airport Community y Team member, contributing signifio these efforts as well as many other s in the community. Katie, Hannah att passed away as the result of an accident in March of 2011. Her conn to the Airport District as a Board r and Community Advisory Team r are acknowledged and apprecir support and desire to construct a und on the airport, providing a place ren to play and families to gather are umented. 0,000 playground was built thanks nership between the Truckee Tahoe District and friends of the Morrison he playground has is already where children playing and the ent of aviation can mix perfectly. All ed to attend the dedication, June m. at the Playground Area adjacent ee Tahoe Airport Administration , 10356 Truckee Airport Road,

fe Shelter turns 25

Copy Reduced to %d%% from original to fit letter page

Life &Learning

COURTESY ASHLEY PHILLIPS

Truckee High School’s River Ecology students release Lahontan cutthroat trout fingerlings with their second-grade “Trout Buddies” from Glenshire Elementary.

Sierra Watershed Education Partnerships to be featured on PBS Special to the Sun Sierra Watershed Education Partnerships (SWEP) would like to thank the community for another successful school year. This spring, a producer and film crew from PBS’s “This American Land” came to the TahoeTruckee region to film two of SWEP’s most successful programs, the Envirolution Club’s Trashion Show and the Trout in the Classroom (TIC) fish release. The TIC program is a conservationoriented, environmental education program that connects students to their local watershed. Throughout the spring students monitor and care for Lahontan cutthroat trout eggs, raising them from egg to fry, and eventually release them into an approved nearby stream or lake. Through this project students learn about native species, habitats, water quality and develop a conservation ethic. Thanks to the Captain Planet Foundation and the Placer County Fish and Game Commission for their support of the 2013 TIC program. For more details on SWEP, and other SWEP programs visit www.4swep.org. Also, be sure to tune into PBS this fall to view SWEP and our local students in action. Exact airing time will be posted on the website.

COURTESY ASHLEY PHILLIPS

Dr. Leri, TTUSD superintendent, releases a LCT fingerling under the watchful eyes of Kings Beach Elementary students.

e Shelter, Inc. (WSI) is celebrating 25 continuous community service this n them and other WSI supporters at July 5, 2013 11:04 pm / Powered by TECNAVIA ual June in Bloom celebration at the All contents © Copyright 2013 sierrasun.com ty Golf Course. Special to the Sun of teaching experience. Her music education. This will be participants have the option oon Critter Program will be at 1 p.m. of performing together again experience includes teaching Shauna’s third year teachffet luncheon and auction at 2:15 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. during Tahoe Dance School’s general music, band, choir, ing voice for the Tahoe Dance Learn to combine hip e Golf Tournament is set for Saturday, School’s Musical Theater hop, jazz, acting and singing 2014 Spring Performance (to and jazz band to students of 11:30 a.m.-4 p.m.-ish. Tickets at the and Foundation musical theater • in133 this Luckie be based on The Wizard GA of 30303 all ages, well as working at• www.captainplanetfoundation.org Camp. $40. Captain Planet Street Atlanta, • as 404-522-4270 various music camps. Shauna Katlin Zimmer is the artisaction-packed, five-day camp Oz) as the show opener. an educational outreach program

Let your children act out: At performing arts camp

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Next  Generation  Science  Standards  for  Native  Trout  Restoration  Project   Third Grade

3-­‐LS1.B: Growth and Development of Organisms



Reproduction is essential to the continued existence of every kind of organism. Plants and animals have unique and diverse life cycles. (3-LS1-1)

Students who demonstrate understanding can: 3-LS1-1. Develop models to describe that organisms have unique and diverse life cycles but all have in common birth, growth, reproduction, and death. [Clarification Statement: Changes organisms go through during their life form a pattern.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment of plant life cycles is limited to those of flowering plants. Assessment does not include details of human reproduction.] Middle School MS-LS2.A: Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems Organisms, and populations of organisms, are dependent on their environmental interactions both with other living things and with nonliving factors. (MS-LS2-1) • In any ecosystem, organisms and populations with similar requirements for food, water, oxygen, or other resources may compete with each other for limited resources, access to which consequently constrains their growth and reproduction. (MS-LS2-1) • Growth of organisms and population increases are limited by access to resources. (MS-LS2-1) • Similarly, predatory interactions may reduce the number of organisms or eliminate whole populations of organisms. Mutually beneficial interactions, in contrast, may become so interdependent that each organism requires the other for survival. Although the species involved in these competitive, predatory, and mutually beneficial interactions vary across ecosystems, the patterns of interactions of organisms with their environments, both living and nonliving, are shared. (MS-LS2-2) MS-LS2.C: Ecosystem Dynamics, Functioning, and Resilience • Ecosystems are dynamic in nature; their characteristics can vary over time. Disruptions to any physical or biological component of an ecosystem can lead to shifts in all its populations. (MS-LS2-4) • Biodiversity describes the variety of species found in Earth’s terrestrial and oceanic ecosystems. The completeness or integrity of an ecosystem’s biodiversity is often used as a measure of its health. (MS-LS2-5)



MS-LS4.D: Biodiversity and Humans Changes in biodiversity can influence humans’ resources, such as food, energy, and medicines, as well as ecosystem services that humans rely on—for example, water purification and recycling.(secondary to MS-LS2-5)



Students who demonstrate understanding can: Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource MS-LS2-1. availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on cause and effect relationships between resources and growth of individual organisms and the numbers of organisms in ecosystems during periods of abundant and scarce resources.] MS-LS2-2.

Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems.[Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on predicting consistent patterns of interactions in different ecosystems in terms of the relationships among and between organisms and abiotic components of ecosystems. Examples of types of interactions could include competitive, predatory, and mutually beneficial.]

MS-LS2-4.

Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on recognizing patterns in data and making warranted inferences about changes in populations, and on evaluating empirical evidence supporting arguments about

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High  School   • •

Changes in the physical environment, whether naturally occurring or human induced, have thus contributed to the expansion of some species, the emergence of new distinct species as populations diverge under different conditions, and the decline–and sometimes the extinction–of some species. (HS-LS4-5),(HS-LS4-6) Species become extinct because they can no longer survive and reproduce in their altered environment. If members cannot adjust to change that is too fast or drastic, the opportunity for the species’ evolution is lost. (HS-LS4-5)

  LS4.D: Biodiversity and Humans Humans depend on the living world for the resources and other benefits provided by biodiversity. But human activity is also having adverse impacts on biodiversity through overpopulation, overexploitation, habitat destruction, pollution, introduction of invasive species, and climate change. Thus sustaining biodiversity so that ecosystem functioning and productivity are maintained is essential to supporting and enhancing life on Earth. Sustaining biodiversity also aids humanity by preserving landscapes of recreational or inspirational value. (HS-LS4-6) (Note: This Disciplinary Core Idea is also addressed by HS-LS2-7.)



  ETS1.B: Developing Possible Solutions When evaluating solutions, it is important to take into account a range of constraints, including cost, safety, reliability, and aesthetics, and to consider social, cultural, and environmental impacts. (secondary to HS-LS4-6) • Both physical models and computers can be used in various ways to aid in the engineering design process. Computers are useful for a variety of purposes, such as running simulations to test different ways of solving a problem or to see which one is most efficient or economical; and in making a persuasive presentation to a client about how a given design will meet his or her needs.(secondary to HS-LS4-6)



 

HS-LS45.

Evaluate the evidence supporting claims that changes in environmental conditions may result in: (1) increases in the number of individuals of some species, (2) the emergence of new species over time, and (3) the extinction of other species. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on determining cause and effect relationships for how changes to the environment such as deforestation, fishing, application of fertilizers, drought, flood, and the rate of change of the environment affect distribution or disappearance of traits in species.]

HS-LS46.

Create or revise a simulation to test a solution to mitigate adverse impacts of human activity on biodiversity.*[Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on designing solutions for a proposed problem related to threatened or endangered species, or to genetic variation of organisms for multiple species.]

   

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